主 办:北 京 中 医 药 大 学
ISSN 1006-2157 CN 11-3574/R

JOURNAL OF BEIJING UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE ›› 2019, Vol. 42 ›› Issue (7): 602-606.doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2019.07.012

• Clinical Studies • Previous Articles     Next Articles

Mitochondrial energy metabolism disorder in depression*

Yu Yao1,Guo Rongjuan2#,Shi Huawei3,Yuan Qingjie4,Li Yang1   

  1. 1 Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029, China;
    2 Dongfang Hospital, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100078, China;
    3 Dongzhimen Hospital, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100700, China;
    4 Beijing Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Beijing 100039, China
  • Received:2019-02-12 Online:2019-07-30 Published:2019-09-03
  • Contact: Prof. Guo Rongjuan, Ph.D., Chief physician, Doctoral supervisor. Dongfang Hospital,Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 10078. E-mail: dfguorongjuan@163.com

Abstract: Depression is a major disease which can cause serious damage to human health. Its pathogenesis is still unclear; and the existing monoamine hypothesis failed to adequately explain its multi-system complex symptoms. Moreover, drug therapy also encountered bottlenecks. Many evidences have indicated that mitochondrial energy metabolism disorder is closely related to the occurrence and development of depression, which may become a new target for depression drug develop ment. In this paper, we put forward the hypothesis of mitochondrial energy metabolism disorder in depression. Our hypothesis is that mitochondrial energy metabolism disorder is an important pathological mechanism for the occurrence and development of depression, and a key pathological phenomenon manifesting as the aggravation of mental symptoms and the generalization of physical symptoms. Therefore, improving the disorder can effectively alleviate the mental and physical symptoms of depression. This hypothesis can provide new ideas for the study of depression.

Key words: depression, mitochondria, energy metabolism disorders, hypothesis

CLC Number: 

  • R277.749