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    Inheritance and development of spleen-stomach theory in Huangdi Neijing (Yellow Emperor’s Internal Classic) by Huang Yuanyu *
    Gao Zhili, He Juan
    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2018, 41 (11): 890-893.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2018.11.002
    Abstract562)      PDF(pc) (1052KB)(1385)       Save
    Spleen-stomach theory is an important academic thought in Huangdi Neijing ( Yellow Emperor’s Internal Classic). The idea of emphasizing earth was a concrete embodiment of Chinese philosophy in traditional Chinese medicine at that time. Later generations of doctors inherited and developed spleen-stomach theory in Huangdi Neijing, among them, Huang Yuanyu, a physician in the Qing Dynasty, was a particular representative. Huang’s theory of qi circumfluence and four images of earth pivot emphasizes the up-downs and rotation of qi in the middle earth, and stresses ascending of the left-side qi movement. He proposed that damp earth, cold water and wood depression were main pathogenesis of human diseases, which has important influence on later clinical practice.
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    Pandemic risk factor analysis of COVID-19 and inspirations from its prevention and control
    Wang Yongyan, Wang Zhong, Bai Weiguo, Zhi Yingjie, Wang Yanping
    JOURNAL OF BEIJING UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE    2020, 43 (8): 621-622.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2020.08.001
    Abstract317)      PDF(pc) (1316KB)(858)       Save
    In order to promote effective prevention and control of the pestilence by traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), it’s of great significance to explore the main ways of the pestilence epidemic. The most weighted epidemic factor is the environmental degradation. Thus, the application of the Yunqi Theory emphasizing “harmony between man and nature” into the prevention and treatment of the pestilence in clinic would be the best way to gain the common consent of the effect and the decrease of the mortality, which might be a good opportunity to show TCM contribution to the health of the human. Based on the standardization of the operation procedures, it’s further suggested that extraction of key elements in patterns of the disease should be viewed as a breakthrough, combined with various technologies from the network, block data and big data of biological blockchain, thus ushering in the third stage of Chinese epidemiology.
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    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2016, 39 (2): 97-100.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2016.02.002
    Abstract476)      PDF(pc) (1070KB)(1377)       Save
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    Study on eight trigrams- zangfu corresponding system based on image thinking of I-ching *
    Li Honghai, Han Qi, Ma Yuexiang
    JOURNAL OF BEIJING UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE    2021, 44 (7): 585-590.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2021.07.002
    Abstract145)      PDF(pc) (778KB)(606)       Save
    Eight trigrams- zangfu system has been used by many TCM doctors since ancient times. It plays a unique advantageous role in the interpretation of visceral manifestation and pathology. However, there still exist disputes and incompleteness in its specific corresponding relations. For example, Luo Dingchang, a doctor in the Qing Dynasty, thought that lung corresponds to Qian hexagram. Sun Yikui in the Ming Dynasty, however, held that Dui is the corresponding hexagram.Meanwhile, Zheng Qin'an in the Qing Dynasty, mainly discussed the heart and kidney from the two hexagrams of Li and Kan. As a result, the theory of eight trigrams- zangfu has not formed a unified and systematic corresponding system. Therefore, our team combined literature review and theoretical discussion in studying the relevant contents of I-Ching ( The Book of Changes in Zhou Dynasty), the TCM- Zhouyi theory, and the basic theory of TCM by using the image-number thinking in I-Ching. Based on the acquired eight trigrams, diction, shape, image and nature related to the physiological and functional characteristics of each viscera, we concluded that the correspondence of eight trigrams- zangfu system is as follows by using the thinking methods of image classification and image-number relation: Zhen corresponds to liver, gallbladder; Xun, liver; Li, heart, small intestine, pericardium; Kun, spleen, small intestine, bladder,triple energizer; Dui, lung, large intestine; Qian, lung; Kan, kidney, bladder,triple energizer; Gen, spleen, stomach, large intestine, gallbladder. And their corresponding relations are refined to the specific functions of zang-fu organs. It is hoped that the analysis and summary of the eight trigrams- zangfu corresponding system will be helpful to the development and research, and inheritance of TCM- Zhouyi theory and visceral manifestation theory, which can provide theoretical reference for clinical practice.
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    On the holistic view of the meridian sinew theory *
    LIN Xingxing,DONG Baoqiang
    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2017, 40 (10): 808-812.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2017.10.003
    Abstract508)      PDF(pc) (1236KB)(1114)       Save
    Current studies on the essence and theory of the meridian sinews are mainly based on anatomical approaches and lack the holistic view of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). This paper explores the holistic relationship between the external nature, internal organs, and internal sinews; the inherent relationship between the sinews and qi and blood in movement, function and system; and the balanced relationship between up and down, left and right, front and back, angle and rectangle based on functional line. The authors hold that establishing the theoretical system of meridian sinews should be and must be placed in a multi-dimensional interconnected network so as to break the shackles of current tendon studies.
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    On relationship among skipping pulse, bound pulse, intermittent pulse and arrhythmia *
    Shen Wuxia, Wang Tianfang, Huo Yanming, Chen Xinran
    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2018, 41 (6): 455-458.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2018.06.003
    Abstract437)      PDF(pc) (1102KB)(866)       Save
    Skipping pulse, bound pulse and intermittent pulse are intermittent pulse conditions commonly seen in clinic, and they are closely related to arrhythmia in Western medicine. They are different pulses but they are generally referred as “intermittent pulses” without any distinguishment in clinical practice. This paper did an inductive analysis on ancient and modern literature about skipping pulse, bound pulse, intermittent pulse and arrhythmia. Skipping pulse is an irregular intermittent pulse with rapid pulse rate, and it can be seen in fast atrial fibrillation, irregular premature contractions, tachycardia and atrial flutter. Bound pulse is also an irregular intermittent pulse but with slower pulse rate, and it can be seen in sinus arrest, sinoatrial conduction block, atrioventricular block, irregular premature systole and escape beat. Intermittent pulse is a regular intermittent pulse with normal, rapid or slow pulse rate, and it can be seen in regular premature contraction, sinoatrial conduction block and atrioventricular block.
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    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2015, 38 (6): 369-372.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2015.06.002
    Abstract483)      PDF(pc) (1079KB)(1218)       Save
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    How traditional Chinese medicine views the body and nurtures life with physical exercises *
    LI Youqiang
    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2017, 40 (10): 817-824.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2017.10.005
    Abstract485)      PDF(pc) (1269KB)(722)       Save
    Compared with the body views in traditional Confucius and Daoism, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has broken through the traditional concept of “body and mind” and “mind is greater than the body”, putting the biological body in the ontological position. TCM views the body from the following three aspects: anatomical body focusing on physiological structure; qi-movement body focusing on movement; and emotional body focusing on emotional status. The anatomical body view corresponds to “neither internal nor external cause” and is against risky physical activities. It advocates sport safety to avoid any potential risk of injury. The qi-movement body view corresponds to “external cause” and advocates physical activities in line with the solar terms rather than otherwise. Emotional body view corresponds to “internal cause” and advocates common mild physical activities. It is against emerging stimulant sports. Therefore Daoyin is considered as the optimal form of exercise for nurturing life. Although those intense stimulant sports are not advocated in TCM body view, there is still room for these types of physical activities to exist, as the logic of TCM body view is to harmonize and regulate all physical activities.
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    Analysis of three formulas against heart-yang deficiency based on syndrome differentiation in Treatise on Cold-Induced Diseases *
    ZHENG Fengjie
    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2016, 39 (12): 973-977.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2016.12.001
    Abstract702)      PDF(pc) (1295KB)(792)       Save
    Heart-yang deficiency syndrome, due to heart-yang deficiency, weak beating and internally exuberant yin cold, is characterized by palpitation or severe palpitations, stuffiness in the chest, lacking in strength, aversion to cold and cold limbs, pale complexion, or even critical signs triggered by syndrome of collapse of heart-yang. Heart yang collapse syndrome can be seen in sever conditions. Guizhi Gancao Tang, Guizhi Gancao Longgu Muli Tang and Guizhi Qu Shaoyao Jia Shuqi Muli Longgu Jiuni Tang, directed at hear-yang deficiency syndrome recorded in Treatise on Cold-Induced Diseases (Shang Han Lun) written by ZHANG Zhongjing, were referred to apply on mild, moderate and severe conditions of heart-yang deficiency. However, based on the analysis of the features of signs and syndromes of the three formulas against, this article puts forward that their indications are all emergency and intensive. And the difference among them are that Guizhi Gancao Tang focuses on tonifying heart to unblock yang, as well as warming the nutrient to nourish blood, resolving qi to move water, calming surging and directing counterflow downward, Guizhi Gancao Longgu Muli Tang emphasizes in subduing and astringing, and Guizhi Qu Shaoyao Jia Shuqi Muli Longgu Jiuni Tang can both treat unreleased of exterior pathogen and internally oppressed phlegm-heat.
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    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2016, 39 (10): 820-823.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2016.10.007
    Abstract296)      PDF(pc) (1224KB)(956)       Save
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    Brief account of Zhang Zhongjing’s medical origin *
    Pan Zhongyi, Fu Yanling, Song Jia, Ni Shenglou
    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2018, 41 (11): 894-899.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2018.11.003
    Abstract497)      PDF(pc) (1123KB)(808)       Save
    Zhang Zhongjing medicine has an extraordinary position and influence in the academic development history of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Those who have studied TCM since ancient times have absorbed nutrient from it. To study Zhongjing medicine, we should first understand its origin and development. In this paper, we comb up this issue from the following three aspects including the origin of Zhongjing medicine, the emergence of Zhongjing medicine, and the branch of Zhongjing medicine. We believe that the origin of Zhongjing medicine can be dated back to Sanshi Medicine in ancient times and Four Medical Schools in the Spring and Autumn Warring States period, the emergence of Zhongjing medicine is reflected as integration of medical classics and classical formulas and coherence of every section of TCM pattern differentiation and treatment, and the branch of Zhongjing medicine is mainly manifested as continuous development of Shanghan schools during 1 800 years, its important influence on other medical branches and schools, as well as the spread and changes abroad.
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    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2016, 39 (8): 643-646.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2016.08.006
    Abstract428)      PDF(pc) (1218KB)(681)       Save
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    Research on the formation and development of academic thought of Liu Wansu’s fire theory *
    Liu Fan, Wei Fengqin
    JOURNAL OF BEIJING UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE    2020, 43 (1): 27-31.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2020.01.006
    Abstract428)      PDF(pc) (1209KB)(541)       Save
    This paper focuses on the formation and development of Liu Wansu’s fire theory to shed light on its influence on the inheritance and innovation of TCM. Firstly, the paper elaborates on the forming process of Liu Wansu’s fire theory, which mainly includes his own practice, collection of classics, and integration of neo-confucianism into the theory. Secondly, from the perspectives of TCM practitioners in the Jin and Yuan dynasties, of warm pathogen diseases and modern scholars, the paper further summarizes the thread of inheritance. Finally, influence of Liu Wansu’s fire theory (formation and development) on the inheritance and innovation of modern Chinese medicine is expounded. To sum up, focusing on classics and learning from various sources are the prerequisite for successful inheritance and innovation.
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    Textual research to identify the original plants for Kui and Dongkuizi *
    ZHOU Guanwu, QI Zhensheng, TIAN Jianfu, DI Guiying, WANG Tao, WU Chengliang, YANG Na
    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2017, 40 (10): 828-832.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2017.10.007
    Abstract375)      PDF(pc) (1249KB)(622)       Save
    This study aims to identify the original plants for Kui and Dongkuizi by reading and analyzing relevant historical literature. Misidentifications, misjudgments and false corrections by Japanese and Chinese experts as well as by modern and ancient scholars have been refuted and rectified based on comparing plant morphological characteristics, nomenclature basis, place of origin, growing environment, indications and therapeutic effects. The findings show that the ancient and modern records of the original plant for “Kui” as well as “Dongkuizi” from the family of Malvaceae is inaccurate. The original plant is creeping spinach (Basella alba, also known as Vine Spinach, Red Vine Spinach, Climbing Spinach) belonging to Basellaceae family.
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    On clinical application of classic formulas from the formula-pattern and formula-pattern element correspondence *
    ZHENG Fengjie
    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2015, 38 (10): 653-657.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2015.10.001
    Abstract507)      PDF(pc) (1250KB)(1007)       Save
    Formula-pattern correspondence is a principle for prescribing formula for a specific mechanism. Correspondence between formula and pattern elements (formula-pattern element correspondence is a new principle developed on the basis of formula-pattern correspondence for formulating prescriptions. They are both under the guidance of "treatment according to pattern identification". Exploring the meanings of formula-pattern and formula-pattern element correspondence can help improve flexibility of practitioners and promote standardization of clinical prescription, expand the modern clinical application of classical formulae and improve the therapeutic effects in the treatment of complicated diseases.
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    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2016, 39 (3): 193-195.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2016.03.004
    Abstract428)      PDF(pc) (1198KB)(1014)       Save
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    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2016, 39 (10): 815-816.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2016.10.005
    Abstract308)      PDF(pc) (1273KB)(493)       Save
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    Connotation of “extreme yin being related to earth qi” in Suwen *
    Wang Mengqi, He Juan
    JOURNAL OF BEIJING UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE    2019, 42 (8): 629-632.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2019.08.003
    Abstract870)      PDF(pc) (1139KB)(438)       Save
    Suwen: Liujie Zangxiang Lun (Plain Conversation: Discussion on Six-Plus-Six System and the Manifestations of Organs) is one of important chapters on the theory of visceral manifestations in Huangdi Neijing (Yellow Emperor’s Internal Classic). On the understandings of the passage of “spleen, stomach, large intestine, small intestine, triple energizers, bladder… are extreme yin and they are related to earth qi”, the physicians in successive dynasties had great difference. The paper proposes, after analyzing the problems existing in several common viewpoints on the passage and combining the application of quartered yin-yang model and writing mode in the chapter, that the extreme yin can be regarded as a compromise saying by the author who tried to explain the relationship between four seasons and five zang-organs, and “extreme yin being related to earth qi” can be understand as extreme yin being related to qi of water and food. The paper also indicates that spleen and other zang-organs interact to each other in physical or pathological conditions. So it is a summarization on their functions of water-food conversion to name spleen and other zang-organs as extreme yin, which has clinical significance.
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    On the origin, development and evolution of five-phase theory *
    YAN Long, HE Juan
    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2016, 39 (9): 709-713.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2016.09.001
    Abstract545)      PDF(pc) (1301KB)(870)       Save
    The theory of five phases is an essential component of philosophic theories in ancient China. However, the contemporary scholars have different views on the origin and the essence of this theory. Based on analysis of ancient literature,the following points of view are proposed. The ancient’s worship of the digit "five" was the basis of formation of five-phase. Formed in the Shang Dynasty late and early Zhou Dynasty,the concept of five phases came from the characteristics of five basic materials in life. Formed in the Western Zhou Dynasty, the viewpoint of restriction in the five phases was derived from the observations of the relationship between the five materials. In the Spring and Autumn Period, the restriction in the five phases was applied to political, military and other fields, and the uncertain restriction in the five phases was discovered.The concept of generation in the five phases which originated in the alternation of seasons was formed in the Warring States Period. It was the production of combination of four-season doctrine and five-material doctrine. Five-phase theory matured during the Warring States Period. The combination of generation and restriction in the five phases completed five-phase theory. Five-phase theory reached its peak in the Han Dynasty. The over-restriction and counter-restriction of five phases were proposed as the improvement of five-phase theory.
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    Discussion on the diagnosis model of disease names of Chinese medicine and Western medicine in TCM practice
    XIANG Ming, LIN Xiang-dong, HE Jun-feng, ZOU Xiao-ling, HUANG Hui-yong
    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2015, 38 (7): 447-449.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2015.07.004
    Abstract605)      PDF(pc) (1085KB)(1530)       Save
    The diagnosis model of disease names of Chinese medicine and Western medicine is widely used simultaneously in TCM practice. Undoubtedly, the standard application of disease names of Chinese medicine and Western medicine, shows a style of normalization of TCM diagnosis and treatment. However, some problems still exist in TCM clinical practice, such as less Chinese medicine disease names, lacking of uniform diagnosis standard in TCM practice, application mechanical leading to rigid diagnosis and treatment, and so on. It is suggested that TCM physicians should carry out the diagnosis model of disease names of Chinese medicine and Western medicine according to the situation.
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    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2015, 38 (9): 591-593.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2015.09.002
    Abstract540)      PDF(pc) (1092KB)(1185)       Save
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    On statement of “if keeping health, Zusanli (ST36) frequently being given festering moxibustion” *
    MA Fangfang, PAN Shixia, LIN Yin, XI Xi, ZHANG Cong, LIAO Yan, WANG Jing, LI Bing, WANG Yichen, KE Xiuhui
    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2017, 40 (5): 371-375.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2017.05.004
    Abstract471)      PDF(pc) (1148KB)(865)       Save
    This article has analyzed the source and clinical significance of statement of “if keeping health, Zusanli (ST36) frequently being given moxibustion” based on philology and medical principles. The statement was recorded in Suosuilu (Trivial Details of Traditional Chinese Medicine) written in early Southern Song Dynasty, which was originally designed for preventing and curing wind diseases. The moxibustion on ST36 is to diffuse and unblock qi and blood of zang-fu organs, but is not to give festering moxibustion. If the statement is explained as repeated festering moxibustion, Yubaizhuang moxibution recorded in Beijiqianjinyaofang (Essential Prescriptions Worth a Thousand Gold for Emergencies) and Bao moxibution recorded in Zhenjiuzishengjing (Classic of Nourishing Life with Acupuncture and Moxibustion) used only in the condition of excessive yang deficiency will be misunderstood. Acupressure, frottage and foot bath can be selected in ST36 healthcare. Considering safety, some mild moxibustion therapies are recommended, such as suspended moxibustion and sandwiched moxibustion, in patients with obvious cold symptoms.
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    Characteristics and clinical significance of pulse condition of regularly intermittent pulse *
    SHEN Wuxia, WANG Tianfang, CHEN Xinran
    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2017, 40 (9): 709-713.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2017.09.001
    Abstract657)      PDF(pc) (1168KB)(725)       Save
    The characteristics and clinical significance of pulse condition of regularly intermittent pulse are discussed based on carding and summarizing the knowledge on regularly intermittent pulse in ancient books and combining cardiovascular theory in Western medicine. As an independent pulse condition, regularly intermittent pulse is found to be characterized by a regular long pause between heartbeats, with pulse rate being normal, fast or slow. Clinically, regularly intermittent pulse can be observed in patients with visceral dysfunction, panic of seven emotions, traumatic injury, wind pattern, pain patterns and heart diseases. It can also be seen in pregnancy women and health people with preternatural capacity. It will be more accurate in clinic to describe bound-intermittent pulse with the text as follows: bound pulse and regularly intermittent pulse appear alternately, pulsing at regular or irregular intervals.
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    Experience of understanding pestilence from the perspective of five-circuit six-qi theory: Reading notes of two supplemented chapters in Suwen
    Wang Yongyan, Fan Yipin, Zhang Huamin, Bai Weiguo, Wang Yanping
    JOURNAL OF BEIJING UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE    2020, 43 (6): 445-448.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2020.06.001
    Abstract447)      PDF(pc) (1248KB)(425)       Save
    The theoretical statements on epidemic diseases in the two originally-lost later-supplemented chapters in Suwen (Plain Questions) suggest that the five-circuit six-qi theory is still of significant reference to the prevention and treatment of pestilence in modern times. Taking three major historical pandemics as example, i.e. encephalitis B in 1974, influenza in 2009 and COVID-19 in Wuhan in 2019, this paper advocates that the TCM community should take the history as a mirror while shouldering the responsibility of preventing and treating epidemic diseases. The circuit-qi theory of the traditional ancient Chinese civilization needs to be integrated with modern ecology, sociology and other diverse disciplines and perspectives to seek the underlying cause of the spreading of pestilence. This paper also summarizes the essential pattern elements and the priority of treatment. Integrated Chinese and Western medical approach is emphasized in the battle against pestilence. The original thinking of holistic manifestation, numbers and changes needs to be highlighted. Under the guidance of ancient Chinese studies, observing the xiang (manifestation) of the disease to discern the underlying dao (way) of treatment should be used to guide the clinical practice.
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    Correlation between Kupperman scores and TCM constitutional types in menopausal women
    WANG Hong-bin, CUI Jian-mei, ZHAO Shu, SUN Na, ZHANG Ping, SHI Yun-ke
    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2014, 37 (4): 277-279.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2014.04.015
    Abstract545)            Save
    Objective To discuss the correlation between Kupperman scores and TCM constitutional types in menopausal women. Methods A TCM constitution questionnaire was used for investigating TCM constitutional types in 130 menopausal women and the results were analyzed. Results ①Age, BMI, menarche age, marriage age, primiparous age, pregnant times and puerperal times had no statistical significance in menopausal women with different Kupperman scores ( P>0.05). ②Kupperman scores were negatively correlated to score of normal constitution, and positively correlated to scores of other 8 types of abnormal constitution ( P<0.01). There was significant difference among menopausal women with the same constitutional types but different Kupperman scores ( P<0.01), and score of normal constitution decreased as menopausal symptoms exacerbated. ③The menopausal symptoms were mostly mild and medium in women with normal constitution, and severe in women with other abnormal constitutions. Conclusion Constitutional types is closely correlated to degree of menopausal symptoms, and differentiation of constitutional types will be helpful to prevention and treatment of menopause syndrome in clinic.
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    On naming COVID-19 in traditional Chinese medicine *
    Liu Tiegang, Bai Chen, Liu Shaoyang, Long Chaojun, Hu Li, Zhao Yansong, Yu He, Gu Xiaohong
    JOURNAL OF BEIJING UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE    2020, 43 (10): 797-803.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2020.10.001
    Abstract546)      PDF(pc) (1274KB)(290)       Save
    Through review of national and regional Diagnosis and Treatment Plan of Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and related literature, this article analyzed the characteristics of COVID-19, and probed into its TCM nomenclature, combining the naming rules for pestilence in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The terms used for COVID-19 in TCM currently include pestilence, cold pestilence, cold-damp pestilence, cold-damp lung pestilence, damp pestilence, dampness-toxin pestilence, warm pestilence, damp-heat pestilence, lung pestilence, wind pestilence, winter pestilence, wind-warm and damp pestilence, wood pestilence, etc. COVID-19 can be generally referred to as “pestilence”in TCM; according to the nature of the symptoms and the characteristics of the pathogenesis, it can be named as “dampness-toxin pestilence” since symptoms of damp nature have maintained throughout the disease course with the pathogenesis of stasis and toxin obstruction; the name of “lung pestilence” according to disease location fails to reflect the lesion site of the disease; the name of “winter pestilence”, “wind pestilence” and “wind-warm and dampness pestilence” according to the time of onset, though in accordance with the definition of warm diseases, does not conform to the characteristics and pathological rules of the disease; according to the five elements motion and six climatic changes, it can be named as “wood pestilence”. At present, it is not suitable to name the disease only according to clinical characteristics, but with increased understanding of this disease, the nomenclature may be further improved.
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    Discussion of kidney excess pattern based on kidney-qi pill *
    SUN Jinghui, HU Xiaoying, WANG Chenglong
    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2017, 40 (4): 281-283.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2017.04.004
    Abstract496)      PDF(pc) (1133KB)(566)       Save
    Since Qian Yi stated that kidney tends to be deficient rather than excessive, a general consensus about absence of kidney excess pattern has been reached among traditional Chinese practitioners in the ancient time. However, Huangdi’s Internal Classic (Huangdi Neijing) has specifically recorded the pulses, symptoms, manifestations, and treatments of kidney excess pattern. Shenqi Wan (Kidney-qi pill) for complex pattern of deficiency and excess, which was created by Zhang Zhongjing, demonstrated morbid dampness was the main cause of kidney excess pattern. Dampness-heat and phlegm-heat is now considered as the dominant cause. In clinical practice, the principle of “treating an excess pattern by purgation” should be followed.
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    Source tracing of triple energizers *
    ZHANG Tianxing, HE Juan
    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2015, 38 (11): 725-728.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2015.11.001
    Abstract434)      PDF(pc) (1252KB)(930)       Save
    According to Huangdi Neijing and Nanjing, the triple energizers (sanjiao), a TCM term, is considered and proved to be the collection of lots of crannies in human body from the aspects of its name, function, shape, characteristics and location. Specifically, sanjiao is composed of three wide crannies below the diaphragm and from which countless tiny crannies extended, that is to say, it is exactly a three-dimensional network performing ying and wei production, qi and blood transportation, water spreading, vital qi communication and original qi transportation. The three wide crannies mentioned above can be considered as the main body of san jiao existed, and the voids in the body is just the position of sanjiao. The paper also tries to explain the fououing issues: sanjiao with name but without form, the relationship between sanjiao and channel, syndrome differentiation of sanjiao.
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    Therapeutic effect of Five Notes of ancient China’s pentatonic scale based on acoustic resonance
    PAN Liang, FAN Di,HU Hui
    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2016, 39 (9): 731-733.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2016.09.006
    Abstract412)      PDF(pc) (1201KB)(692)       Save
    Five Notes of the ancient China’s pentatonic scale (hereinafter “Five Notes”)is associated with the five zang-organs theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine by five phases theory . The therapeutic effects of Five Notes had been recorded in ancient Chinese medical books. After observation of environment and human body and their interaction, our ancestors had classified various things or different parts of the same thing into wood, fire, earth, metal and water, based on qi movement style. The same kinds of things have energy in common, which arise from their natural frequency. Human zang-organs undoubtedly are substances, and their energy which present in the form of physiological function, come from zang-organs’vibration of natural frequency. Theory of the manifestations of organs was the combination of zang-organs’matter and energy. Therapeutic effect of music is by the way of resonation between human body and qi via sound waves.
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    A differentiation and analysis on connotation of disease-syndrome in Chinese medicine *
    SHEN Yifan, GAO Xue, XIAO Yonghua, ZHAO Jinxi, ZHU Li, WANG Jidong, SUN Huiyi
    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2017, 40 (3): 181-184.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2017.03.001
    Abstract548)      PDF(pc) (1208KB)(610)       Save
    Disease-syndrome is a frequently used term in clinical Chinese medicine. Disease-syndromes are body’s abnormal states affected by pathogenic factors with the same basic pathology, which are classified under the guidance of traditional Chinese medicine theory. Basic pathology is essential for the classification of disease-syndromes. It is the internal stable connection among all elements in disease-syndrome, and reflects and runs through the whole progress of disease-syndrome. In addition, basic pathology is also the internal basis used for determining the main symptoms of disease-syndromes and the laws for diagnosis and treatment in Chinese medicine. The implication of disease-syndrome is different from disease, syndrome and symptom. To properly understand the implication of disease-syndrome has a contribution to summarizing the previous clinical experience and guiding the clinical practice.
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    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2015, 38 (2): 81-82.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2015.02.002
    Abstract510)      PDF(pc) (1061KB)(724)       Save
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    A new interpretation of “extreme yin turning into yang, extreme yang turning into yin” in Huangdi Neijing *
    Zhang Tianxing
    JOURNAL OF BEIJING UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE    2020, 43 (1): 17-20.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2020.01.004
    Abstract952)      PDF(pc) (1146KB)(479)       Save
    The statement of “extreme yin turning into yang, extreme yang turning into yin” came from the chapter entitled Yinyang Yingxiang Dalun (Major Discussion on the Theory of Yin and Yang and the Corresponding Relationships Among All the Things in Nature) in Suwen (Plain Questions). Based on the annotations of ancient doctors, this paper put forward the viewpoint of interpreting yin and yang from the aspect of interior and exterior. “Extreme yang turning into yin” means that when the exogenous pathogens are too strong or the exterior is repeatedly influenced by six pathogenic factors, the disease will transmit from the exterior to the interior, injuring qi movement of five zang-organs. “Extreme yin turning into yang” means that when the internal injury is too severe, which leads to deficiency or disorder of internal qi, the exterior will also be involved, resulting in the recurrence of exogenous diseases. The statement that “happiness and anger injure the qi, while heat and cold injure the appearance” describes the law of how endogenous and exogeous pathogens cause diseases, while “extreme yin turning into yang, extreme yang turning into yin” describes the valatility of diseases. The essence of “extreme yin turning into yang, extreme yang turning into yin” is to explain the relationship between exogenous and endogenous disorders. This idea is the theoretical basis for clinical understanding of the causes, analysis of pathogenesis, and pattern differentiation, and it merits forther exploring and developing.
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    On significance of ancient astronomical coordinate systems for research into doctrine of five circuit phases and six atmospheric influences *
    Meng Qingyan, Zhang Qicheng, Zhang Qingxiang, Liu Yuanyuan
    JOURNAL OF BEIJING UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE    2019, 42 (12): 983-987.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2019.12.003
    Abstract437)      PDF(pc) (2006KB)(403)       Save
    As an important part of TCM theory, the doctrine of the five circuit phases and six atmospheric influences involves the pattern of changes in nature based on human’s observation and life experience.The doctrine emerged when astronomy in ancient China had reached a high level of precision.Thus, this paper analyzes the characteristics of three ancient astronomical coordinate systems,which may provide some reference for current study of the doctrine.It probes into the doctrine of the five circuit phases and six atmospheric influences and corrects some mistakes in the present research on the doctrine by analyzing it in the specific context where it emerged and developed. It also deepens the connotation of the doctrine by revealing the major, essential and inevitable factors in its formation, which provides reference for the learning and theoretical study of the doctrine.
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    Analysis of the properties of ancient aromatic Chinese herbs and the application of the theory of “aromatics acting on the spleen” in Huangdi Neijing *
    Huang Hsunying, Liu Zhenzhu, Wang Weiguang, Zhai Shuangqing
    JOURNAL OF BEIJING UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE    2021, 44 (6): 485-490.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2021.06.001
    Abstract190)      PDF(pc) (749KB)(234)       Save
    The theory that aromatic medicinals act upon the spleen was first put forward in Huangdi Neijing (Huangdi’s Internal Classic). It was believed that aroma primarily acted upon the spleen, so aromatic herbs also had a special regulatory effect on the spleen. In this paper, through classifying commonly used aromatic herbs recorded in ancient books on Chinese materia medica, and making statistical analysis of their nature, taste, meridian tropism and efficacy, we further explored the medicinal characteristics of aromatic herbs and their special effects on the spleen. Statistical results show that most aromatic herbs are warm in nature, and pungent and bitter in taste, and they enter primarily the spleen meridian, and secondarily the liver meridian. In terms of efficacy in modern Chinese materia medica, such herbs serve mostly to rectify qi, invigorate blood, dissolve stasis and dissipate wind-cold. It can be seen that aromatic medicinals do primarily act upon the spleen, and their effects are not limited to resolving dampness and inducing resuscitation. In addition, their pungent taste have dispersing and moving effects, their bitter taste can dry dampness, and their warm nature can raise yang. As pungent medicinals open and bitter medicinals direct things downward, aromatics are especially conducive to restoring spleen and stomach’s physiological function of raising the clear and directing the turbid downward, and then maintaining the qi circulation in the five zang and six fu organs. Therefore, the authors argue that the spleen must have played an important role in aromatic herbs’ clinical application to remove dampness and awaken the spleen and even to open the orifices and resuscitate, which also provides pharmacological evidence for the theory that aromatic medicinals act upon the spleen in Huangdi Neijing.
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    Theoretical analyses on “tongue is the orifice of heart” *
    Li Yu, Zhang Xueliang, Zhang Min, Wang Qingguo
    JOURNAL OF BEIJING UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE    2020, 43 (1): 32-34.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2020.01.007
    Abstract456)      PDF(pc) (1136KB)(356)       Save
    The statement “tongue is the orifice of heart”, also known as “heart opens into the tongue”, comes from the Huangdi Neijing (Huangdi’s Internal Classic). The physiological function and pathological changes of the heart are closely related to the tongue. As the orifice of the heart, tongue is connected with the heart on meridians and channels. Tongue expresses the heart by helping articulate, while the heart dominates mind by opening into the tongue. By observing the tongue, doctor can underst and the functional state of the heart’s governing blood vessels and mind. Clinically, the theory of “tongue being the orifice of the heart” can guide the diagnosis and treatment of such diseases as orifice occlusion.
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    Similarity, difference and correlation between syndrome elements and syndrome essential factors
    LIANG Hao, PENG Qing-hua, ZHOU Xiao-qing, HUANG Hui-yong
    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2015, 38 (1): 18-21.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2015.01.004
    Abstract782)      PDF(pc) (1184KB)(778)       Save
    Syndrome elements and syndrome essential factors, which are both hot topics in TCM theory research in recent years, are originated from same theory and same standard with totally different definitions which are presented in the aspects of basic concept, combining disease and prescription with syndrome; that is called “triple forks from one source(Yi Yuan San Qi)” . Traditional Chinese medicine is a relative conservative science; it is rather difficult to germinate new theories and viewpoints. Once a new theory is put forward, it will undoubtedly bring about differentiation, interaction, contending and integration of TCM science. It is necessary to clarify the similarity, difference and correlation between syndrome elements and syndrome essential factors, which will be the key to the development of TCM diagnostic.
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    Treatment of dawn diarrhea based on liver cannot be ignored: time medicine foundation
    MAO Pei, ZHANG Yuzhong
    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2017, 40 (11): 902-905.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2017.11.005
    Abstract497)      PDF(pc) (1142KB)(453)       Save
    About the pathogenesis of dawn diarrhea, medical experts of all dynasties consider that dawn diarrhea is induced by spleen-kidney yang deficiency, and fire failing to warm earth, so dawn diarrhea is also called “renal diarrhea”, which can be treated with Sishen Wan (Four Miracle Pills) as a basic formula in clinical practice. However, after more thought, the authors fully unders tand the influence of liver on the occurrence of dawn diarrhea, which is the key of treatment from the chronomedicine perspective, though kidney has close relationship with the disease. The five watches of the night are in Yin Mao, which is subsumed to wood in the five elements, belongs to qi of shaoyang. At the time of five watches, qi of shaoyang sends up, and because of insufficiency of spleen, wood severely restricts earth, then dawn diarrhea occurs.
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    A review on Huangdi Neijing’s contribution to critical disease management in TCM emergency discipline *
    Wang Xiaopeng, Chen Tengfei, Liu Qingquan
    JOURNAL OF BEIJIGN UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINE    2018, 41 (2): 93-96.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2018.02.001
    Abstract485)      PDF(pc) (1256KB)(522)       Save
    Huangdi Neijing (Huangdi’s Internal Classic, hereinafter referred to as Neijing) not only laid the foundation of traditional Chinese medicine theories, but also recorded quite a few data about critical diseases. Neijing categorized and named critical diseases, and most of those diseases were named as Jue (syncope), bao (sudden onset), and cu (sudden death), which built a series of basic pathogenesis theories for TCM critical diseases. The statements of yin-yang relationship in Neijing illuminated the pathogenesis of critical disease to a large extent. Neijing explicitly recorded manifestations, diagnosis thinking pattern, treatment principles, and therapies of critical diseases. Neijing marks the establishment of TCM emergency system, and provides basic theories for TCM emergency.
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    Mechanism of five notes of ancient China’s pentatonic scale in disease treatment based on meridian and collateral theory *
    Lin Facai
    JOURNAL OF BEIJING UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE    2019, 42 (6): 465-468.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2019.06.005
    Abstract637)      PDF(pc) (1169KB)(367)       Save
    A study of the mechanism of the correspondence between the five notes and the meridians is of great significance for the therapeutic effect of the five-element music. The five notes of ancient China’s pentatonic scale are in close association with the meridians and the acupoints on them. Based on the five-element theory, a corresponding relationship between the five notes and the meridians came into existence. The present research explored the mechanisms of the five notes, the correspondence between the meridians along with acupoints and the five notes, the diagnosis and treatment with the five notes, and the appropriate application time for the music therapy based on midnight-noon ebb-flow theory of meridians and collaterals, aiming to lay a solid foundation for a better understanding of the mechanism of the five-element music and provide new thoughts and methods for the clinical application of the five notes including the administration of music treatment in accordance with time of the day.
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    Study on Shen Tong and his book Shigu
    Yan Minmin, Huang Zuozhen
    JOURNAL OF BEIJING UNIVERSITY OF TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE    2019, 42 (2): 103-108.   DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-2157.2019.02.003
    Abstract484)      PDF(pc) (1379KB)(355)       Save
    Shen Tong is a scholar of Qing Dynasty in classics study and textual criticism. He kept close contacts with masters of classics such as Hui Dong and Fang Bao. Xu Lingtai, a famous doctor in the Qing Dynasty, was his fellow townsman. He had lived in Xu’s hospital for a period of time, during which an acupuncturist asked him some questions about acupoint. Since he was ashamed of his ignorance of the structure of human body and worried about the erroneous exposition that had been circulated since the Tang Dynasty, he decided to write the book later known as Shigu. Shigu (Explaining bones) is a TCM anatomy book on bones. The main contents in this book included the names, locations and appearances of bones in all parts of body which had been mentioned in Huangdi’s Internal Classics and AB Classic of Acupuncture and Moxibustion. The exegesis and styles of this book are characterized by the statement that ”to confirm the word by classics, and explain classics with the word”. Although short in length, it had a profound influence. It was first published in Sixteenth years of Emperor Qianlong in Qing Dynasty (1751), and spread to Japan soon after its publication, becoming an important reference book for acupuncture and moxibustion as well as the explanation of Huangdi’s Internal Classics. It is of great significance in the history of TCM anatomy.
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